Garden Inspiration…

herbteagarden

 

Hi Friends!

One thing leads to another!
Has this ever happened to you?

Over the past few weeks,

I’ve often thought of the charming, children’s book,

If You Give a Mouse a Cookie. (Take a moment to enjoy the read-aloud here!)

Today’s post, inspired by Laura Numeroff’s sweet, children’s book,

offers a peek into the unexpected activity in my garden over the past few weeks…

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If you give a gardener…

a wonderfully written and illustrated book,

Homegrown Tea ~ An Illustrated Guide to Planting, Harvesting, and Blending Teas and Tisanes

by Cassie Liversidge,

it will quickly become one of her very favorite books about growing herbs and teas.

As she reads, she will decide…

to move the Monarda (also called Bergamot or Bee Balm) from her Butterfly Garden

back to her Herb & Tea Garden, where it grew many years earlier.

She will realize that she doesn’t really need a small Butterfly Garden bed,

when her entire yard is a butterfly garden!

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After she transplants the Monarda to the ‘heart of her garden,’

she will decide…

to move her favorite, old-fashioned flowers from her Cutting Garden,

to the inside of her Herb & Tea Garden,

along the white picket fence

(built with love).

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How sweet it will be to tend the fragrant herbs,

surrounded by Bleeding Hearts, Hydrangea, Coreopsis, Black-eyed Susans, Coral Bells,

Speedwell, Obedient Plant, and Phlox!

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As she moves these perennials,

she will realize…

 that she really doesn’t need a Cutting Garden bed,

next to the deck, near the towering pine trees,

because over the years

her entire garden has grown into a cutting garden!

Each morning, she happily fills vases of flowers to bring the beauty of the garden inside.

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On those hot, humid days that aren’t suitable for digging in the garden,

she will dream her garden dreams…

with paper, ink, stamps, and watercolors

in her little Paper Garden studio.

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What fun to design tiny gardens, using Art Impressions Watercolor stamps! (Bee skep is from a vintage Stampin’ Up set.)

While she creates little gardens on paper,

she will decide…

that it would be fun to grow tall, colorful blossoms

along both sides of her white, garden arbor,

where the pink and purple Clematis bloom.

So…

when the days are a bit more comfortable,

she will spend hours and hours…

digging out patches of Daylilies,

day after day,

to make her garden dreams come true.

She will move beautiful Phlox that were already growing in the yard

when she bought her little bungalow 29 years ago.

They were such a lovely gift

left by those who gardened here

long before her

and are a very special part of the history of

her beloved, 94-year-old cottage garden.

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Patches of pink, white, and purple Phlox,

spiky purple Obedient Plant,

and delicate, pink Coral Bells

will welcome visitors who step through the arbor,

and follow the flagstone path to the Herb & Tea Garden.

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So, the happy gardener will…

stay busy as a bee

in her cottage garden

digging, transplanting, mulching,

and

‘watercoloring’ with perennials

as the late Summer days

turn to early Autumn.

What a joy it will be to watch her ‘new’ old-fashioned garden emerge in the Springtime!

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If you give a gardener…

a wonderful book to read,

the seeds of inspiration will grow!

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It has been a true joy to find so much inspiration

in my summer reading…

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and I have lots more to share!

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I’m so happy that you stopped to visit today!

What books have inspired you most this summer?

Hope you will leave a comment to share with us…

Wishing you lots of happy!

♡ Dawn

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A Fascinating Walk!

VoloBogIL

Hi Friends!

It’s a wonderful tradition that began early on, when my husband and I were just getting to know one another! Very often, we found ourselves walking near water, with moments of peaceful silence and interesting conversations about anything and everything. Oh the beautiful places we have walked together! Not the types to sit on a beach, we have strolled along Lake Michigan beaches, the beaches of Waikiki, and along the North Shore of Kauai. Walks along the River Seine, the River Rhein, the Lower Salt River in the Sonoran desert, and the Illinois River hold so many dear memories. Over the years, we have enjoyed walking along rushing waterfalls, meandering creeks, and a quiet marsh. Yet, there has always been another watery destination on our long list of places to walk ~  a bog!

So, Sunday morning, we packed a picnic lunch and drove north quite a distance to the Volo Bog State Natural Area. Our walk was filled with unexpected surprises, lovely views, and new learning. We both agreed that it was one of our more fascinating walks… and I couldn’t wait to share our walk with you!

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With our first glimpse of the Volo Bog, we were very curious about the large patches of pink in the distance. It was time to explore!

This bog originated about 12,000 years ago as the Wisconsin glacier crept into northeastern Illinois. As the climate warmed, the ice melted and glacial lakes formed. The trees (in the photo above) mark the edges of the old glacial lake. 

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Volo Bog has a floating boardwalk, allowing visitors to view various parts of the bog while walking just above the bog’s surface.

This was our chance to walk just inches above the surface of a bog! We could feel the floating walkway moving gently underfoot with each step. We walked very slowly, as dragonflies and butterflies floated overhead and a chorus of nearby crickets and frogs sang for us. Below the boardwalk, the 50-foot deep bog was filled with plants growing in this unique wetland.

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From time to time as we walked, there were views of peaceful, open water, surrounded by cattails and sedges. However, most of the bog is now lush with plant growth.

A bog is a very unique type of wetland. It forms in a glacial lake that has very poor drainage and no inflow of water from streams. Rain water and melting snow fill the bog. A floating mat of peat, which is partially decayed plant matter, began to form long ago at the Volo Bog.  The roots of living plants support this thickening peat layer.

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Volo Bog is the only ‘Quaking Bog’ with an open water center in Illinois. Its floating mat of sphagnum moss and other plants is so thick in some places that a person could actually stand on it. However, this would not only damage the bog, but would be incredibly dangerous. The floating boardwalk allows visitors to safely explore the bog.

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Cattails turn to seed in mid-August at Volo Bog.

As early as 10,000 years ago, the Native Americans settled in northeastern Illinois. The Volo Bog, a distance from large waterways, would have provided good hunting grounds and places to gather arrowhead roots, cattails, blueberries, and other edible plants.

BogFloraColorful wildflowers were in full bloom throughout the bog and the pollinators were very active on this mid-August day.

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The wooden boardwalk leads visitors through four different plant communities at Volo Bog. As we made our way, the changing plant species seemed to take us back through time. Winterberry Holly, Dogwood, and Poison Sumac were among the tall shrubs in this part of the bog. During times of high water from rain and melting snow, some of the Tamarack trees in this area drowned. Ancient ferns also grow in this shady area of the bog.

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This diagram shows the different plant zones we observed as we followed the boardwalk (yellow dotted trail) to the ‘eye’ of the Volo Bog.

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The ‘eye’ of the Volo Bog is not an ordinary pond. It is 50 feet deep and everything you see is floating… even the Tamarack pine trees in the distance! As the plant layers in the bog continue to grow and decay, scientists predict the open water at the ‘eye’ will be overgrown with vegetation in the next 100-150 years.

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Tamarack pine trees grow in this part of the plant community. These unusual pines are deciduous! In Autumn, their needles turn golden yellow and fall onto the peat soil below. The Tamarack trees, with their shallow, spreading roots, float up and down as the water levels change in the bog.

Sphagnum moss carpets the ground in this area of the bog. Native American mothers gathered and dried this moss to line their cradle boards, as a sort of diaper. Early soldiers used dried sphagnum to cover their wounds in the battlefields, since this moss produces acids with antibacterial properties.

BogFaunaThe bog is a wetland habitat for so many animal species.

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This circa 1900 dairy barn was renovated to create a wonderful, educational Visitor Center at the Volo Bog.

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As a result of our rainy summer, water levels seemed high in this open water area of the bog.

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Waterbirds searched for food in the moss-covered water, while a family of turtles took turns sunning on a floating log.

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The bog is a beautiful, fragile ecosystem that we must carefully preserve.

As we walked along the boardwalk, observing the variety of plants and animals that make their homes in this habitat, my thoughts turned to my own garden. Years ago, as I added new flower beds, I would occasionally buy a large bag of peat moss to mix into the soil. Never again!!

Most of our commercially harvested (actually, it is ‘mined’) peat in North America comes from Canadian sphagnum moss. Our walk reminded me once again that bogs are fragile wetlands that must be preserved! There are much better (and cheaper) alternatives to amend the soil in our gardens ~ local leaf mold compost, wood chips, composted garden waste, and green kitchen compost. Continued use of these plant materials will keep my garden a healthier, more responsible little patch of nature for years to come!

Thanks so much for stopping to visit today!

This is my 100th post at Petals.Paper.SimpleThymes… 

and your visits and thoughtful comments are always such a treat for me!

♡♡♡♡♡♡

Enjoy your week!

♡ Dawn

P.S.  Do you enjoy walking near water, too?  Please tell us about your favorite places to walk…

 

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Home ‘Tweet’ Home

Foxgloves

Hi Friends!

Oh, my! These young summer days are keeping me as busy as a bee outside! I celebrated the Summer Solstice by spending the whole day in the garden. Time in the garden has been a rare blessing for the past few weeks. So, it was a real treat to make time for a bit of pruning and weeding on the longest day of the year. What a glorious morning it was!

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‘Stella d’Oro’ Daylily (Hemerocallis) and ‘Dalmation Rose’ Foxglove (Digitalis purpurea) add a welcome splash of color to our white, picket fence Herb & Tea Garden in June.

 

As I worked, surrounded by a sea of bright, orange Daylilies and fluffy, white ‘Annabelle’ Hydrangeas, the butterflies and bees were busy working right alongside me. The birdsong was especially cheerful on this special day, too!

As I busily pruned the Quince bush that grows near our ‘Welcome’ arbor, I had to suddenly stop cutting the long branches.

For there it was…

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Robin’s nest with four eggs waiting to hatch.

The mother robin must have seen me approach with my pruning sheers in hand and quickly flown away. I was astonished to find the sturdy nest with four beautiful eggs!  Of course, I had to stop pruning and left the nest undisturbed, hoping the mother would return. The Quince bush has a very funny shape right now, short in front, with long branches remaining in the back to protect the nest.

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With great relief, I noticed the mother robin return shortly to her little Home ‘Tweet’ Home!

Just a few feet away, while I weeded along the Friendship Garden bed, I could hear very cheery, bubbling birdsong nearby. I quickly discovered that the music was echoing from a unique, wooden birdhouse that has been in my garden for years. I’ve always considered it decorative, with its barnwood box, metal roof, and interesting, antique metal embellishments. Mounted on a pitchfork, this birdhouse always stands waist-high in a Daylily bed, near our garage.

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Imagine my delight, as I followed the singing and peeked in to see little beaks bobbing up and down! All weeding stopped, as I reached for my camera, and watched Mother Nature’s show on this first day of summer! The happy family of house wrens continued to sing for their breakfast, while the mother and father dashed out to bring back moths and other insects. They watched me, as I sat motionless watching them. One-at-a-time, the adults would hunt for an insect, land on the white picket fence near the Foxglove, fly to the small Elm tree, fly to the birdhouse, look around and dart into the hole. It happened again and again as they worked to feed their happy, little family! (You can enjoy their bubbly birdsong here.)

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There is nothing quite like a small, happy family taking good care of one another,

in an old home surrounded by colorful, flower gardens.

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It is definitely a Home ‘Tweet’ Home kind of summer here this year!

I have undertaken a HUGE project that will truly keep me as busy as a bee for quite a while.

Working on home improvements makes me oh-so-happy!

I have always loved restoring the beauty of an older home.

In fact, that’s the reason that I moved into this cozy bungalow so many years ago.

All those years of watching This Old House and reading Old House Journal have left their mark on my heart.

As our home nears the century mark, it’s time for another project filled with hard work and tender, loving care.

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Front Porch Restoration ~ Phase One: Ceiling and Trim

While my parents were visiting us in May, we shopped together for the best tools and supplies for my big project. In early June, I began the front porch restoration. Scraping and painting the ceiling and trim took weeks. I am taking special care as I remove the old paint, so clean up each day has been long and meticulous. My husband and I wrapped the front of the house in plastic to protect it from dripping paint. (Thank goodness! There were lots of drips.) I’m so happy with the way the ceiling turned out!

This week, I will scrape and paint the four porch columns. In the coming weeks, I will work to strip and restore the floor. Finally, we will have new railings and stairs designed and built. With each phase of the project, I am learning new things. It was so exciting to discover all of the colors that the ceiling had been painted over the years! As I work, I often think about the history of our front porch and why it is so important to me to carefully preserve it. I can’t wait to hang the original porch swing again, bring out the original rocking chair, and add our vintage wicker furniture to this very special outdoor room!

Day-after-day as I work, neighbors are offering kind words of encouragement and passersby often call out, “Lookin’ good!” as they walk past. My favorite music is playing  and I’ve been singing along to keep my energy high. I’ve had to climb down from my ladder several times to do a little happy dance… because that’s just how I am feeling! ♥

Taking on a HUGE project like this really feels quite

exhausting,

achy (with sore muscles),

hot (especially wearing protective gear),

solitary (missing fun times with my friends),

challenging (as I solve problems along the way),

but most of all…

empowering!!

I love it!

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Waving from the top of my ladder!

I’ll be back just as soon as I can… with so much to share.

Sending happy summer wishes from our little Home ‘Tweet’ Home to yours!

Warm hugs!

♡Dawn

P.S.  When was the last time you completed a hard task that left you feeling empowered? Hope you will share with us…

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A Peaceful Walk…

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♪♪ (Please listen to the Mindfulness Bell here as you read. Allow the Bell to chime once at each photo.)

Hi, Friends!

 A peaceful walk,

on Saturday afternoon,

was a treasured

souvenir

of summer’s swan song.

We discovered a lovely

Peace Path

that wound through a magnificent prairie,

planted with native Illinois grasses and woodlands.

We walked slowly,

hand-in-hand,

between

Father Sky and Mother Earth,

mindful

of our

blessings,

feeling

present

and filled with

gratitude.

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Join us for a

walking meditation

along the Peace Path

as we pause

with intention

at each place along the path,

to ring

the meditation bells,

mindful of our powerful connection to nature.

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The Peace Path winds through

the grounds of the Tau Center.

Both indoors and outdoors,

this peaceful place

welcomes individuals and groups

of diverse spiritual traditions

to nourish

body, mind, and spirit.

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Breathe in a moment.

As one season slips into the next,

may your heart be filled with peace and gratitude.

Namaste.

♡Dawn

The Presence of Wonder

{via}

Hi Friends!

We truly were in the presence of wonder! We were two dear friends taking a walk in one of the loveliest of places on a hot summer day. The Morton Arboretum is glorious to behold any day of the year. A hot, humid August day was no exception.

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The Morton Arboretum in Lisle, Illinois

In the bright, morning sunshine, we meandered along the Conifer Walk pausing often to enjoy the cool shade and admire these beautiful cone-producing trees.

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Conifers have long inspired writers, poets, artists, and songwriters.

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In his epic poem, Evangeline, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow wrote,

“This is the forest primeval. The murmuring pines and the hemlocks…

stand like druids of eld, with voices sad and prophetic.”

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Pines inspired Woodnotes II, as Ralf Waldo Emerson wrote,

“Who leaves the pine-trees, leaves his friend,

unnerves his strength, invites his end.”

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Lord Voldemort, the main villain in the Harry Potter books, carried a wand of yew.

Author J.K.Rowling said the properties of yew matched his character ~

long-lived and poisonous.

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I’ve always been drawn to pine trees. They bring back such sweet, childhood memories of visiting my great uncle, a forest ranger, in northern Wisconsin. He grew pine trees all over his wooded, country property, gifting small ones to my grandparents and parents to plant in their own gardens. As we grew taller, so did our beautiful pine trees.

Imagine my joy, years later, when I first saw a cozy, little bungalow with a swing on the front porch AND two towering pine trees in the yard!  My heart told me that it should be my own ‘home sweet home.’ Pines always fill me with the presence of wonder…

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Dawn Redwood (Metasequoia glyptostroboides)

Whenever I walk among the trees, I just love to reach up and touch their leaves.  The soft, feathery leaves of this tree felt so friendly and welcoming to my touch. A nearby sign brought both very happy and terribly sad news… This lovely tree is the ‘Dawn Redwood.’ Oh, the wonder of discovering that one of my favorite trees at the arboretum shared my name!

Very sadly, the ‘Dawn Redwood’ tree is critically endangered! “Forty million years ago, the ‘Dawn Redwood’ was the most common sequoia in North America. Today, only about 1,000 remain in the wild, and they all live in one remote area of China. Those few remaining trees are disappearing as forests are cleared to create farmland.” The sign also explained, “In China, extensive seed collecting is hurting this tree’s ability to reproduce. The Chinese consider this tree second only to the panda, as a conservation icon.” Fossils date the ‘Dawn Redwood’ trees back to the days of the dinosaurs.

One way that we can all take action is to contact our local arboretums or botanic gardens to learn whether any ‘Dawn Redwood’ trees grow in our own communities. “Learning to identify endangered trees is fun, and education is key to changing behavior.”

Leaving the Conifer Walk at Morton Arboretum

Leaving the Conifer Walk at Morton Arboretum

The presence of wonder was all around us, as we followed the path along Meadow Lake. The wildflowers were abuzz with busy bees and fluttering butterflies.

Meadow Lake at the Morton Arboretum

Meadow Lake at the Morton Arboretum

Coneflowers danced in the sunshine.

Coneflowers danced in the sunshine as we walked by.

The presence of wonder was all around us as we lingered at Wonder Pond, admiring the gorgeous weeping willow trees, and all of the plants that thrive in and around the stillness of the pond.

There is so much to see as we stood gazing at Wonder Pond.

There was so much to see as we stood gazing at Wonder Pond.

DSCN5632The tall plants along the edge of the pond offered shelter and rest stops for dragonflies. Illinois is home to nearly 100 kinds of dragonflies. We spotted one right away! Look closely into the tall plants and you can see a Widow skimmer dragonfly at rest.

Widow skimmer dragonfly at Wonder Pond

Widow skimmer dragonfly at Wonder Pond

Widow skimmer

Widow skimmer dragonfly

We walked on to the Children’s Garden, with its amazing natural wood and rope bridges for climbing among the trees, and child-friendly water features. This award-winning, four-acre garden, is celebrating its 10th birthday this year. What a popular place for children of all ages to grow and experience the presence of wonder!

Colorful perennial gardens also attracted children, parents, grandparents, nature lovers, and of course, lots of pollinators on that hot August day!

DSCN5648We were also treated to some whimsy of the man-made variety, at the Morton Arboretum. LEGO artist, Sean Kenney and his creative team spent over 4,170 hours and used 464,770 LEGO bricks to create and assemble 27 sculptures, throughout the arboretum. Visitors were in awe of Kenney’s skill and artistry with LEGOs!

'Monarch on Milkweed' sculpture by Sean Kenney

‘Monarch on Milkweed’ LEGO sculpture by Sean Kenney

'Herd of Deer' sculpture, by Sean Kenney, is 80% life size.

‘Herd of Deer’ LEGO sculpture, by Sean Kenney, is 80% life size.

'Galapagos Tortoise and Finch scupture, by Sean Kenney contains 23,317 LEGO bricks. It took 290 hours to build!

‘Galapagos Tortoise and Finch’ sculpture, by Sean Kenney, contains 23,317 LEGO bricks. It took 290 hours to build!

The ‘Nature Connects‘ exhibit

of Art with LEGO bricks, by Sean Kenney,

will be on display at The Morton Arboretum through November 1, 2015.

‘Nature Connects’ is an important reminder that “nature’s building blocks ~ trees, plants, insects, birds, animals, and people ~ depend on all of the other ‘pieces‘ to construct a healthy planet.”

A day at the Morton Arboretum truly inspires reflection

on the ways we are all connected by nature,

and the responsibilities that we all share.

DSCN5609The presence of wonder is everywhere

at the Morton Arboretum!

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“Trees need our help more than ever before.”

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Hope you will stop to visit this special place…

in person, or online!

Wishing you a wonder-full day!

♡ Dawn

P.S.  What kind of trees hold a special place in your heart?

Golden Sunshine

Come into my garden, so my flowers can meet you.

“Summer afternoon, summer afternoon:

to me those have always been the two most beautiful words

in the English language.”  

~ Henry James

Hi Friends!

What a delightful summer afternoon!

Today was made of blue skies, gentle breezes, warm sunshine,

buzzing bees, singing cicadas, and colorful butterflies fluttering about.

Happiness was blooming in every direction…

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“The garden

is a mirror of the heart.”

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Gardenkeeping was on my agenda today.

Mowing the lawn, trimming bushes, and deadheading flowers

are always much more fun

when one is surrounded by

golden sunshine!

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Bright yellow highlights our Friendship Garden this month.

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Rainy days in June helped the ‘Herbstsonne’ shining coneflower (Rudbeckia nitida ‘Herbstsonne’) grow taller than it ever has grown before!

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Bright patches of yellow add sunshine throughout the entire garden in August.

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Although phlox, salvia, obedient plant,

 mums, hydrangeas, bee balm, and coreopsis

fill the garden beds

with shades of purple and pink.

Yellow takes center stage in our garden in August,

brightening even the cloudiest of days

with

golden sunshine!

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Today I hope you will find a little

golden sunshine…

and carry it with you wherever you go!

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Thanks so much for visiting today!

My flowers were so happy to meet  you!

Garden blessings!

♡ Dawn

P.S.  What color really stands out in your garden this week?

 

Chatting by the Garden Gate…

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Are mosquitoes taking a bite out of your summertime fun?

Hi Friends!

Just taking a few moments to stop and chat over the garden gate on a warm, sunny afternoon…

We have had another cool, rainy week here in our Midwest cottage garden. In the afternoon sun, several Red Admiral butterflies have been darting around. It’s such fun to watch their quick, erratic flight patterns while working in the garden!

Red Admiral butterfly  {Photo Credit}

Our perennials have grown taller than ever before during the past rainy weeks. The weeds are thriving, too! Last week, the mosquitoes hatched in great numbers, making my time in the garden oh-so uncomfortable. On our recent walk through the garden, hungry mosquitoes forced me inside, covered with itchy bites. When I appealed to our blog friends, they offered several suggestions to keep the mosquitoes at bay. I am ever-so grateful for all of the wonderful ideas!

Girl Scout badges bring back such happy memories for me!

Today, I bravely tried this suggestion, from my friend, Jo…

Jo in Western Springs, IL said:

“Dawn, your gardens are so very lovely! As regards the mosquitoes, when I had a Girl Scout troop and we would go on hikes, the girls would tie a clothes dryer sheet in a buttonhole and this would deter the pesky little biters (mosquitoes, not girls). Give it a whirl! Happy summer days to you!”

My sweet memories of Girl Scout days encouraged me to try Jo’s idea first! Since we always have clothes dryer sheets in the laundry area, this morning I took out a Bounce dryer sheet, with high hopes. While wearing long sleeves and long pants for added mosquito protection, I quickly rubbed the Bounce dryer sheet over my clothing and then tucked it into my shirt pocket. Off I went to cut the grass and pull weeds. I’m thrilled to report that after four hours in the garden, I had no mosquito bites at all! I could see the mosquitoes flying nearby, but they left me alone today! What a difference from last week!! (Jo, you are such a blessing!! It feels like your idea has given me back the joy of gardening during our terrible mosquito invasion!! ) ♡

I couldn’t wait to share the happy news! I spotted my neighbor, a mother of newborn twin daughters, in her garden and went over to tell her the surprising news. She was so thrilled to have a solution that didn’t involve repellent sprays!! We rubbed her clothing with my Bounce dryer sheet, and then she ran inside to get a dryer sheet for her pocket, too. Tucking the dryer sheet through a button hole would also work great! My neighbor is planning to attach a dryer sheet to each hood of her double stroller every time she takes the twins for a walk. We are both feeling very hopeful that we will be able to enjoy our summer days again!

I wanted to share Jo’s wonderful  suggestion, just in time for your weekend activities!

If you do try the dyer sheet method to repel mosquitoes, be sure to check back and let us know if it works for you.

The Chicago area will have the second highest mosquito population in the U.S. this summer. {WGN news}

Our blog friends offered so many helpful suggestions to repel mosquitoes on last week’s post.

I’m so grateful for all of their ideas…

Jayne told us about purchasing a hat infused with mosquito repellent, trying the natural repellent Swamp Gator,

and using products containing Deet, then showering immediately after gardening work.

Penny has tried B-1/Thiamine, but only found success with a strong repellent.

Martha Ellen shared her husband’s success applying SKIN SO SOFT by Avon to all exposed skin.

In last week’s post, I suggested planting Citronella, Marigolds, Lavender, Catnip,

Basil, and Lemon Balm as natural mosquito repellents.

As always, our kind readers continue to share great ideas!

June shared her wonderful idea in the comments below. Scroll through the comments to see how

she uses white vinegar to prevent mosquitoes from biting! What a great tip!

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Do let us know if you try any of our suggestions with success!

We all want to enjoy our time in the garden

throughout mosquito season!!

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Thanks so much for stopping by! I always enjoy our visits here.

Wishing you a pleasant weekend filled with your favorite summertime activities!

Enjoy today!

♡Dawn