Turning Purple…

Hi Friends!

We all have so much on our hearts these days. I hope that you are safe and healthy in your corner of the globe. News reports of the devastating wildfires out west and the aftermath of Hurricane Sally along the Gulf Coast seem unimaginable. Sending renewed strength and hope to all those affected. Know that you are in our thoughts…

Here in Illinois, the sidewalks, trails, and tracks are turning purple all month long! We are honoring 2020 World Alzheimer’s Day (September 21st) in whole new way. Instead of huge Walks to End Alzheimer’s, families, friends, and small groups are walking in their own communities for this very important event.

Our family was grateful for the efforts of Team Spectrum in today’s Walk to End Alzheimer’s!

Our Saturday was off to a very chilly start. The sun quickly warmed our hands and hearts as we looked forward to this meaningful day. Our first stop was a nice visit with my parents this morning. My mom and dad are both being very brave as they strive to live their best lives throughout this pandemic. What powerful lessons in resilience they are teaching us all!

The heartbreak of a loved one living with Alzheimer’s disease has been extra challenging during the time of Covid-19.  Wearing masks conceals important facial cues, like friendly smiles. So, we try extra hard to smile with our eyes! Spending more time inside at home can be frustrating when a loved one with cognitive decline feels the need to walk around more and more. We are so grateful for the pretty indoor areas where my parents can stretch their legs and chat with their neighbors. On warm, sunny afternoons, they enjoy listening to music and watching the birds from their balcony, overlooking a beautiful, wooded area. “Elbow Hugs and Kisses” just aren’t as good as the real things, so we laugh each time we do these silly actions! Although a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease may not remember that we came to visit, each time they glance at a fresh picked bouquet from my garden they will know just how much they are loved!

This afternoon, my husband and I enjoyed our very own Walk to End Alzheimer’s in a pretty little park. We were the only ones there! 🙂 As we followed the trail passing a prairie area and a peaceful pond, we shared our hearts and so many family memories. In the shade of the tall oak trees, our feet crunched over fallen acorns with each step. We noticed the scampering squirrels and a black swallowtail warming its wings in the afternoon sun.

It wasn’t long until a family of swans joined our Walk to End Alzheimer’s. 🙂

The colorful flowers on our t-shirts represent the reasons that people fight to end Alzheimer’s.

Blue = I’m living with the disease.

Yellow = I’m supporting/caring for a loved one with the disease.

Purple = I have lost a loved one to the disease.

Orange = I support the cause,

a world without Alzheimer’s.”

Although we are all walking in our own communities this year to be safe from the Corona virus, we are all sharing the same hearts. Just knowing that so many others are intentionally walking to fight for a cure, makes me feel less alone. It’s proof that we are all striving for the same thing. We are all in this together!

The moment we returned home, 

I went online to make my donation to the Alzheimer’s Association.

It always feels so empowering to help make a difference!

♡♡♡

If you are able, I encourage you to help us find a cure

by making a donation, too!

Just click here.

Click here to donate to the Alzheimer’s Association.

The Alzheimer’s Association is a vital resource for those suffering with this heart-wrenching disease, their families, and their caregivers. They are leading the fight against this disease! They offer so many valuable online seminars. The ALZ Helpline (800-272-3900) offers live support 24/7 from caring professionals to answer questions and concerns. Their helpful webinars present the latest research and extremely helpful information for caregivers. The Alzheimer’s Association funds vital research and clinical trials in search of a cure. The research studies presented at the 2020 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference are very interesting and quite promising! I am truly grateful for the work of the Alzheimer’s Association and the difference they are making for so many families, just like mine.

Click here to read last year’s post, “Sharing My Heart.”

Although my blog only turns purple once each year, my family is living with this disease each and every day. The Walk to End Alzheimer’s is so much more than a fundraising event. During this special time, we honor all those who are impacted by this heartbreaking disease, their loved ones and care partners, and those who fight for a world without Alzheimer’s and other dementia.

White flowers = I feel hopeful that we will find a cure.

With all my heart, I HOPE that one day,

in my lifetime,

we will find a cure and see the first person to survive this disease.

The end of Alzheimer’s starts with me! ♥

The reason is LOVE.

With hope,

Dawn

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“The Longest Day”

Hi Friends,

In honor of the Summer Solstice, the day with the most light, I am here again shining a light on “The Longest Day” event, held each year by the Alzheimer’s Association. (This is a repost from last year’s fundraising event.) Heartfelt thanks for taking the time to read… ♥♥

Next time, we will gather here to ‘Chat by the Garden Gate’ and see what’s blooming in my garden! 🙂  Wishing you a beautiful start to Summer!

 

Hi Friends!

Our blog is going Purple today…

and the reason is LOVE.

It is my greatest hope that you will share

in “The Longest Day” on June 21st.

In the past year, Alzheimer’s Disease has touched my family and made an profound impact on all of our lives. In search of ways to help my family, I have dedicated much of my time and energy to learning all that I can about this heartbreaking disease.  The Alzheimer’s Association is helping me every step of the way…

 

My family is not alone.

The statistics are truly alarming….

By age 65+    1 in 9 people are diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease.

By age 85+    1 in 3 people are diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease.

More women are diagnosed with Alzheimer’s than men.

Although there are different types of dementia, 80% of dementia is Alzheimer’s disease.

No one has ever survived Alzheimer’s disease.

The Alzheimer’s Association is leading the fight against this disease. They offer valuable seminars at public libraries throughout our area. Their helpful webinars present the latest research and extremely helpful information for caregivers. The Alzheimer’s Association Help Line (800-272-3900) offers live support 24/7 from caring professionals to answer questions and concerns. The Alzheimer’s Association funds vital research and clinical trials in search of a cure.

Siberian Iris with Birdbath

I have been able to take advantage of so many of these valuable resources during the past year. Attending caregiver support groups and connecting with friends, whose families have also been affected by this disease, has  helped me learn about the difficult journey that my family now faces. Most importantly, everything that I learn about the journey of Alzheimer’s disease, I have been able to share with my entire family. Although it is a truly heartbreaking disease, I am so grateful for the work of the Alzheimer’s Association and the difference they are making for so many families, like mine. 

   Please take just one minute to watch this video…

For people suffering with Alzheimer’s disease,

their families, and their caregivers,

each day filled with challenges

can feel very long.

Today I am sharing my heart with you

and raising awareness

of a wonderful way we can all help

in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease

with great LOVE…

On “The Longest Day” (June 21st), people across the globe

will do what they LOVE,

or what their loved ones affected by this disease LOVE to do.

Together, we will raise funds and awareness

for care and support of those affected,

while advancing ALZ research.

We are working toward the first survivor

of Alzheimer’s disease.

Last year, I spent “The Longest Day” in such a poignant, meaningful way. My entire day was devoted to activities that I LOVE. Early in the morning, I took a long, solo walk in nature along our beautiful Prairie. With each step, I knew that I was doing something very important. Next, I spent many hours tending my flower and herb gardens. All the while, my heart was honoring someone so dear to me. I spent the rest of the day downstairs in my little Paper Garden studio making cards filled with LOVE and sending them off to loved ones, far and near.

Although I was intentionally doing what I love most, my day felt very long. It made me think about just how long and difficult each day must feel to someone with Alzheimer’s disease facing so many challenges.

The most important thing that I did that day

was to make a donation to the Alzheimer’s Association!

It felt so good!

This button is a link to donate to ALZ.org

 

 I am already looking forward to

“The Longest Day” 2018.

My husband will take a day off work on Thursday

so that we can participate in this important day together.

We will spend the entire day doing things we LOVE

to honor our loved ones.

However, the most important thing we will do

on “The Longest Day”

is to make our donation to the Alzheimer’s Association.

 

Breaking News! June 21, 2018  

Your Donation today will be matched by a very generous donor!

                                                 Your donation today will help twice as much!

It felt so good to make our donation early this morning! ♥♥

 

We can all make a difference by helping the Alzheimer’s Association in the fight to end this disease. Throughout the past year, I have been quietly fundraising and donating to the Alzheimer’s Association. Now it’s time to raise my voice… and ask for your help, too.

It feels very empowering to make donations to the fight against Alzheimer’s disease. It makes me very hopeful that one day, in my lifetime, we will find a cure and see the first person survive this disease.

The end of Alzheimer’s starts with me! ♥

The reason is LOVE.

With hope,

♡ Dawn

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Simple, Quiet Beauty

Hi Friends!

Dark, storm clouds threatened overhead very early on the Summer Solstice as my husband packed up our car. (Meanwhile, I took just a moment to make our online donation to “The Longest Day” fundraiser for the Alzheimer’s Association. It made my heart feel so good to help fund the care, support, and research so desperately needed in the fight to end Alzheimer’s disease.) Moments later, we drove off to spend “The Longest Day” and the next few days doing something we LOVE, while honoring special people we LOVE. It was a perfect way to celebrate our wedding anniversary! The reason was LOVEa whole lot of LOVE!

We set off in search of simple, quiet beauty, a bit of adventure, small town charm, and perhaps some antiquing, too! As we headed south, heavy rains accompanied us throughout our three-hour drive. Rain was also predicted for the next few days. We hoped for the best as we watched the skies.

Our destination was Amish Country in Central Illinois. Over the years, we have enjoyed visiting Amish areas in Indiana. It would be so interesting to learn more about the Amish people living in our home state. We thought you might like to come along…

This beautiful, quiet region is filled with Amish farms, picturesque small towns with brick-lined streets, quaint antique shops, fun places to eat, and the friendliest people ever. The towns of Arcola, Arthur, and Tuscola, just a few miles apart, welcomed us… and the rain stopped just moments after we arrived! 🙂

 

Amish families moved from Pennsylvania and Indiana to Central Illinois, beginning in 1865, in search of more affordable land and wide-open spaces. Today there are more than 5,500 Amish people living in this area surrounded by large corn and soybean fields, stretching as far as the eye can see.

The Amish people are a very close-knit community. They are hardworking farm families, who often run small, creative, home-based businesses. Roadside wooden signs welcome visitors to quilt shops, woodworking shops, herb shops, bakeries, and more in Amish homes. The Amish are very friendly and open to answering questions about their simple lifestyle.

Religion guides all aspects of Amish life. They have chosen to live a life that is separate from the world. The Amish believe in peace and nonviolence and do not pass judgement on outsiders. They don’t fully accept the modern conveniences that we take for granted. By choosing not to use electricity, they are able to avoid many of the temptations that would impact their family lives. The Amish people value simplicity over convenience and comfort.

In this area, typical Amish farms are approximately 80 acres. The average Illinois Amish family has six children. When a young, Amish couple gets married, they are usually gifted with a parcel of land to farm, from one of their fathers.

We frequently traveled the winding, country road between Arcola, through the tiny hamlet of Chesterville, to Arthur. It warmed my heart each time we passed road signs reminding drivers to be cautious of slow-moving buggies. The familiar ‘clip-clop’ of the horse and buggy feels like a gentle reminder to savor life at a slower pace.

Most of the country roads have wide shoulders that serve as buggy lanes. For safety, the Amish people use battery-powered lights on their buggies. We always used caution whenever following a buggy and slowly passed them with care so we didn’t frighten the horse. We also saw many Amish people riding bicycles on warm, Summer days. Although the Amish people don’t own cars, they do accept rides in other people’s vehicles when necessary.

Each Amish farmhouse we passed had a large tank to store gas or diesel fuel to power their generators. They use bottled gas to operate their water heaters, modern stoves, and refrigerators. Gas lanterns and oil lamps light their homes.

Telephones are not permitted in Amish homes. We noticed wooden phone booths at the end of some driveways, near the road, shared by neighbors for emergencies and business. Today some Amish people have cell phones that can also be used outside their homes.

Families play games, build puzzles, do schoolwork, and read together in the evenings. No musical instruments are played in the homes for that would be worldly. As with all farm families, it is an “early to bed, early to rise” lifestyle.

 

In this area, families are “House Amish.” They gather in homes to hold their Sunday church services. There are 22 church districts in the area surrounding Arthur. When Amish families gather together, they speak their first language, a German dialect.

Horse-power is so important on Amish farms. Farmers drive teams of 6-8 horses to farm their rich land. Their tractors have metal wheels without rubber tires. In recent years, available farmland has become both expensive and scarce in Central Illinois. So, many Amish farmers have also taken on a trade.

In the evenings, we noticed Amish buggies hitched in the parking lot of several businesses in towns. After the farm work is done for the day, some Amish people may supplement their income by working in town for a few hours.

In addition to large farm fields, Amish homes also have big vegetable gardens and fruit trees. Beachy’s Bulk Foods sells everything else that a family might need to prepare meals and preserve fruits and vegetables for the Winter season.

As we drove along the country roads, we noticed every clothesline was filled with plain, dark colored pants, shirts, and dresses. Amish women work hard using wringer washers to do their laundry.

Our rainy Spring in Illinois has been very welcome to our farmers. Instead of “Knee-high by the Fourth of July,” the cornstalks were already shoulder-high by the third week of June.

It was fascinating to learn about Amish wedding traditions. November is the most popular month for Amish weddings. During Spring, Summer, and Fall there is too much work and little time for wedding celebrations. Tuesdays and Thursdays are the the usual days for Amish weddings, since they are the least busy days during their week. An Amish wedding takes place in the bride’s home with a four-hour ceremony. There are no rings, flowers, photos, caterers, or kisses. Typically, more than two hundred guests are invited to celebrate the happy couple!

 

“Amish people are not backwards, nor ‘stuck in the past.’

They are constantly adjusting to the pressures of the world

and striving to maintain their belief and culture.”

“It is a very delicate balance between tradition and change”.

~ National Committee for Amish Religious Freedom

We enjoyed every moment of our visit to Amish Country. I have much more to share in future posts, including several ‘hidden gems’ in the area. One of our most cherished memories is the kindness of everyone we met along the way.

The motto of the town of Arthur (population 2,200) is “You are a stranger only once.” There is so much to discover in this patchwork quilt of quiet, simple beauty and we relish the chance to learn more. We are already planning our next visit!

Although we kept our rain gear close at hand, we felt so fortunate to have dry weather for our adventures. While we were away, my garden soaked up three more inches of rain. It was a delight to find the ‘Annabelle’ Hydrangeas in full bloom when we arrived home!

I enjoyed slower-paced days the following week

without turning my computer on! 🙂

Where do you find simple, quiet beauty?

Happy Independence Day to all of our American friends

as we celebrate family, friends, and freedom!

 

Make each day sparkle!

♡ Dawn

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“The Longest Day”

Hi Friends!

Our blog is going Purple today…

and the reason is LOVE.

It is my greatest hope that you will share

in “The Longest Day” on June 21st.

In the past year, Alzheimer’s Disease has touched my family and made an profound impact on all of our lives. In search of ways to help my family, I have dedicated much of my time and energy to learning all that I can about this heartbreaking disease.  The Alzheimer’s Association is helping me every step of the way…

 

My family is not alone.

The statistics are truly alarming….

By age 65+    1 in 9 people are diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease.

By age 85+    1 in 3 people are diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease.

More women are diagnosed with Alzheimer’s than men.

Although there are different types of dementia, 80% of dementia is Alzheimer’s disease.

No one has ever survived Alzheimer’s disease.

The Alzheimer’s Association is leading the fight against this disease. They offer valuable seminars at public libraries throughout our area. Their helpful webinars present the latest research and extremely helpful information for caregivers. The Alzheimer’s Association Help Line (800-272-3900) offers live support 24/7 from caring professionals to answer questions and concerns. The Alzheimer’s Association funds vital research and clinical trials in search of a cure.

Siberian Iris with Birdbath

I have been able to take advantage of so many of these valuable resources during the past year. Attending caregiver support groups and connecting with friends, whose families have also been affected by this disease, has  helped me learn about the difficult journey that my family now faces. Most importantly, everything that I learn about the journey of Alzheimer’s disease, I have been able to share with my entire family. Although it is a truly heartbreaking disease, I am so grateful for the work of the Alzheimer’s Association and the difference they are making for so many families, like mine. 

   Please take just one minute to watch this video…

For people suffering with Alzheimer’s disease,

their families, and their caregivers,

each day filled with challenges

can feel very long.

Today I am sharing my heart with you

and raising awareness

of a wonderful way we can all help

in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease

with great LOVE…

On “The Longest Day” (June 21st), people across the globe

will do what they LOVE,

or what their loved ones affected by this disease LOVE to do.

Together, we will raise funds and awareness

for care and support of those affected,

while advancing ALZ research.

We are working toward the first survivor

of Alzheimer’s disease.

Last year, I spent “The Longest Day” in such a poignant, meaningful way. My entire day was devoted to activities that I LOVE. Early in the morning, I took a long, solo walk in nature along our beautiful Prairie. With each step, I knew that I was doing something very important. Next, I spent many hours tending my flower and herb gardens. All the while, my heart was honoring someone so dear to me. I spent the rest of the day downstairs in my little Paper Garden studio making cards filled with LOVE and sending them off to loved ones, far and near.

Although I was intentionally doing what I love most, my day felt very long. It made me think about just how long and difficult each day must feel to someone with Alzheimer’s disease facing so many challenges.

The most important thing that I did that day

was to make a donation to the Alzheimer’s Association!

It felt so good!

This button is a link to donate to ALZ.org

 

 I am already looking forward to

“The Longest Day” 2018.

My husband will take a day off work on Thursday

so that we can participate in this important day together.

We will spend the entire day doing things we LOVE

to honor our loved ones.

However, the most important thing we will do

on “The Longest Day”

is to make our donation to the Alzheimer’s Association.

 

Breaking News! June 21, 2018  

Your Donation today will be matched by a very generous donor!

                                                 Your donation today will help twice as much!

It felt so good to make our donation early this morning! ♥♥

 

We can all make a difference by helping the Alzheimer’s Association in the fight to end this disease. Throughout the past year, I have been quietly fundraising and donating to the Alzheimer’s Association. Now it’s time to raise my voice… and ask for your help, too.

It feels very empowering to make donations to the fight against Alzheimer’s disease. It makes me very hopeful that one day, in my lifetime, we will find a cure and see the first person survive this disease.

The end of Alzheimer’s starts with me! ♥

The reason is LOVE.

With hope,

♡ Dawn

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